SPOT Saves

Our Featured Rescue Stories.
5,000 RESCUES AND COUNTING THOUSANDS OF RESCUES MADE. COUNTLESS LIVES TOUCHED.


Deaf hiker Amelia Milling relies on trail dog and SPOT for rescue after falling 700 feet in Alaska
Credit: Kelly McCarthy, Good Morning America, ABC



RESCUE PROFILE: Douglas
CASE #: 14356
TYPE: Boating-Ocean


RESCUE PROFILE: Ren
ASSET: Motorcycle


RESCUE PROFILE: Michael
CASE #: 15697
TYPE: Off-Road Motorcycle



S.O.S. on SPOT Device Proves Life-Saving Twice for Canadian Man


Ontario Rescue
Rescue Profile: Randy Cota
Ticket # 23488

“What I really like about your system, not only does it get in touch with police, it gets in touch with search and rescue.” – Randy Cota, Survivalist from remote area of northern Ontario, Canada

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Plane Crash Survivor Credits SPOT Device with Rescue


Montana Rescue
Rescue Profile: John Gregory
Ticket # 23325

“The engine quit, and I ended up in a tree. By the grace of God, I didn’t fall out of it.”

That is what 79-year-old John Gregory says about April 23, 2019, the day his plane crashed into a tree in a remote part of Idaho.
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S.O.S. Used to Help Injured Teen on Montana Mountain


Montana Rescue
“The messaging feature of the SPOT X is invaluable.”

Rescue Profile: Brandon Van Arsdale
Case # 51537

The day started as a skiing expedition through the mountains of Montana and ended with a helicopter rescue. On March 20, 2019, a group of teens and adults were on the Glacier/Pondera County line when a teenager in the group was hurt. After an unsuccessful attempt to alert rescue crews, Brandon Van Arsdale, an adult travelling with the teens, activated the SPOT X’s S.O.S. button.

Before this emergency Brandon had only used the device to message back and forth with his wife when he went on expeditions. “I received a text asking what was the emergency, and I was able to text back to help coordinate the rescue,” said Van Arsdale.
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First SPOT X Initiated Rescue


Darrel Comeau

Rescue Profile: Darrel Comeau
Case # 24249

Darrel Comeau was on a four day trip to climb a remote mountain in Willmore Wilderness Park, located in Alberta, Canada, which is a 4,600 square kilometer wilderness area adjacent to the world-famous Jasper National Park.

Around 4am, Darrel’s dog Kitty, punched him in the face and started whining. Darrel woke up and rolled over to hush him. That’s when he realized he wasn’t breathing. Darrel’s airway was completely blocked. His experience working with Grande Prairie Technical Search and Rescue, prepared him for this, and he stuffed his finger in his throat to clear whatever was blocking his airway. Turns out it was his Uvula, with a large infected mass that was falling into his airway. He continued to struggle to breathe. He couldn’t talk, he couldn’t scream for help. So with his vision blurred from the chocking tears, Darrel reached for SPOT X clipped to his bag and pressed S.O.S.

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Experienced Hikers + Severe Weather = SPOT Rescue


Ian Scott

Rescue Profile: Ian Scott
Case # 20588

In late September, three experienced mountain hikers were on a two-night backpacking trip in Kananaskis Country, Alberta in the Canadian Rockies. On the second day of their trip, a heavy snowstorm hit and made it difficult to find the trail out. The trio was forced to retreat to the previous campground they had stayed at the night before. They had brought additional food and fuel and had ample shelter with two tents between the three of them. They were unsure of how long they would be stuck in the mountains and with dwindling cell phone reception, how they would call for help if needed.

Even though they were familiar with the backcountry location, the severe weather made it difficult to navigate. In the midst on the storm, they were able to follow tracks from other hikers but the heavy snowfall eventually covered the tracks up. Ian put fresh batteries in his Garmin GPS on Friday and only used the unit during the hiking portions of their trip. By Sunday afternoon, the cold weather and elevation had drained the batteries and they felt the best step to take was to retrace their steps back to Ribbon Lake and wait out the snowstorm.

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